Wastewater Treatment/Reclamation

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NWWRP

The City of Mesa has three water reclamation plants:

  • Northwest Water Reclamation Plant (NWWRP)

    Located in the northwest corner of Mesa, this state of the art reclamation facility has a treatment capacity of 18-million gallons per day. This facility has treatment that includes screening, grinding, sedimentation, organics removal, nutrient removal, filtration, clarification, and disinfection. The effluent from the NWWRP is discharged to two recharge sites and the Salt River, which also recharges the aquifer. In the near future it will also be used for freeway irrigation and at the Granite Reef Underground Storage Project for recharge purposes.
  • Southeast Water Reclamation Plant (SEWRP)

    Located within the Superstition Springs Golf Course, the SEWRP is also a state-of-the-art facility that has an 8-million gallon per day treatment capacity. Treatment includes screening, grinding, sedimentation, organics removal, nutrient removal, filtration, clarification, and disinfection. The effluent from this plant is used for golf course landscape irrigation, pond replenishment, and agricultural irrigation.
  • Greenfield Water Reclamation Plant (GWRP)

    Located in Gilbert, this facility is a 16-million gallon per day water reclamation plant that treats sewage from southeast Mesa, the southeast portion of the Town of Gilbert, and all of the Town of Queen Creek. This treated water is pumped directly to Gilbert's recharge facilities and to the Gila River Indian Community through an intergovernmental agreement for beneficial reuses on agriculture. The GWRP is undergoing expansion to increase Mesa's capacity of the existing plant by 10 million gallons per day. 

What is recharge?

Water that is recharged is carried by pipes to acres of contained land allowing percolation to occur. The soil between the ground and the aquifer is one of mother nature's natural treatment processes, so the water undergoes additional treatment prior to entering the groundwater supply. Not all groundwater wells are used for drinking water; many are used for crop irrigation, golf course irrigation, and urban lakes. Recharge is an integral part of the Mesa's 100-year water supply requirement for continued development.